While some changes may be welcomed, the agreement adds another hurdle when schools have to re-assign teachers after having already met with their students. The school year began on September 16 and students in all classes can take personal lessons until October 1. Principals may be forced to redouble their efforts to revise their schedules to accommodate new waves of teachers empowered to work from home. Also included in the agreement: parent-teacher conferences are held online unless a personal meeting is requested. Marilyn Ramirez, a chapter principal and teacher at the special bilingual school at Washington Heights High School of Media Communications, said Friday that her colleagues` group chat “started” with happy texts about the new deal — especially the ability to work from home when students are also at home. Overall, she felt the agreement was an indication that city officials were “listening now.” The agreement attempts to address a staff crisis by allowing schools to circumvent some of the rules set out in a previous agreement with the teachers` union. But it also leads to a whole series of new complications. In a reversal of the Department of Education`s policy, New York educators are now allowed to work remotely when teaching students learning from home, according to a new agreement reached Friday between the city and the teachers` union. And other changes could be coming: the agreement is for another cycle of work guides that is “imminent”. These guidelines should describe some of the tasks that can be performed online for teachers with personal responsibilities. Updated Paraprofessional Agreement: This newly published DOE guide provides a detailed explanation of the roles and responsibilities of paraprofessionals during this particular phase of screen and distance learning.

See the full guide “Some schools provide, for example, for students to learn on virtual platforms, even if they are in school buildings, or ask educators to teach a mix of personal and remote students at different times of the day. The initial agreement between the city and the union discouraged him and required separate teachers for those who are physically in school and those who learn from home. Now, principals could have more flexibility. A Queens director, who asked not to use his name because he was not allowed to speak to the press, said the late deal makes his job “1,000 times more difficult.” He said he relies on teachers who work with students remotely to help with students arriving and firing, which now involves temperature checks and health checks. . . .